Forum Posts

Paul Wilkins
Feb 01, 2022
In Discussions
Despite the fact that social media is now such a huge part of our lives, the majority of financial advisers I speak to have failed to harness the power of social media marketing to grow their businesses. In most cases, it's not that they don't believe in social media or don't want to use it - it's just that they don't know how to. So in this article I'm going to explain how IFAs and other financial advisers can use LinkedIn to generate leads from individuals and businesses that are looking for financial advice. What is LinkedIn? Just like Facebook, Twitter, and all the rest, LinkedIn is a social network. The thing that makes LinkedIn different from the other social media channels is that it has positioned itself as a professional networking platform and has a strong business-to-business (B2B) focus. Because LinkedIn is known as a B2B social network, some IFAs steer clear of using it due to the fact that they want to work with individuals rather than corporate clients. But remember, most individuals that you want to have as clients will either own a business or will have a job. And that means they are very likely to be users of LinkedIn. Therefore LinkedIn still offers lots of opportunities to generate leads, even if you're a financial adviser whose client bank is made up of individuals rather than businesses. LinkedIn currently boasts 675 million members worldwide, with over 28 million of these being based in the UK. These numbers are still growing, with two new people signing up to LinkedIn every second. How Does LinkedIn Work for IFAs? Much like other social media platforms, LinkedIn allows you to make connections with other users of your choice, be it other professionals in your area or with potential clients. And, as noted above, theses two groups are likely to have a big overlap. You can then keep in touch with these connections by posting engaging content on LinkedIn for others to see, sending direct messages to them, or commenting on posts they have made themselves. I read somewhere that everybody on this planet is separated by only six other people. Six degrees of separation between us and everyone else on this planet. John Guare LinkedIn refers to the people you are directly connected to as your 1st degree connections. If someone is not connected to you but is connected to one of your connections (think friend-of-a-friend) then they are a 2nd degree connection. And if someone is not connected to you, but is connected to one of your 2nd degree connections, then they are a 3rd degree connection. This model is based on the famous six degrees of separation principle. Because LinkedIn was built as a business networking site, it has more information about its members' professions, employers, and skills than the other social networks. This means that LinkedIn is great for when you want to market to people based on their profession or where they work. For example, suppose you are an IFA specialising in financial planning for doctors. LinkedIn's powerful search facilities will make it easy for you to find all the doctors in your 1st, 2nd, or 3rd degree network and begin a conversation with them. Or maybe you want to find local mortgage brokers to partner with. Either way, LinkedIn's ability to find people based on what they do for a living or what sector they work in means you can concentrate your marketing and networking efforts on a specific niche audience, which enables better results. LinkedIn Profiles for Financial Advisers Your LinkedIn profile can be thought of as the online version of a traditional CV. It is your chance to make an impact, show off your skills and detail your experience. This is your opportunity to wow those potential new clients and connections. Here are some helpful tips for making the most of each section of your LinkedIn profile: Write a Killer LinkedIn Profile Headline Your headline is what will draw potential clients in when they come across you on LinkedIn, whether they've stumbled across you by accident or actively searched for a financial adviser. It will also give people a first impression of you when you send them a connection request. Get your headline right and people will be inclined to read on. Make sure you offer more than just your job title here. The last thing you want is a headline such as Director at The Advice Centre or, worse still, something as uninformative as Head of Sales. Just because your LinkedIn profile can be thought of as an online CV, that doesn't mean you have to use a headline that's based on your current job title. Instead you should make sure your headline conveys a powerful marketing message - where the product being marketed is you. Say what you do to help people, not what you do for a living. Point out the benefits your clients get from working with you as opposed to another financial adviser. Get creative and maybe detail specifics on how you have helped clients overcome a particular problem in the past. Here are some randomly chosen examples of the type of headlines that most IFAs end up using: Not really very exciting, are they? And here are two examples of financial whose headlines are much better because they highlight the benefits that their service delivers: And, finally, here are a couple of headlines from financial advisers who are differentiating themselves by focusing on a specific niche, rather than trying to appeal to all of the UK's 28 million LinkedIn members: Include a Good Profile Photo Remember that LinkedIn is a site for professionals, not a place for checking out your friends' latest holiday snaps. With that in mind, aim for a really good quality head shot. Make sure there are no distractions in the background and that you are close enough to the camera and well lit. If you have the budget, hire a professional to take some photos of you at work in smart dress. Definitely steer clear of photos with other people present, or a drunken shot of you down the pub on Friday night with your mates. Examples of Good Photos Examples of Bad Photos Make the Most of Your About Section This section of your LinkedIn profile is where you can really get to shine. It is your chance to summarise the most important points about you and the services you offer. Be sure to start off with a strong opening sentence. This will encourage potential clients to read on. Think carefully about what keywords to include in order to increase your chances of showing up in search results to help people find you. Stick to Relevant Experience Although similar to a CV, the experience section of your LinkedIn profile doesn't have to include everything that you would put on your classic CV. When it comes to the experience section, it is wise to only include relevant experience. There is no need to include the weekend job you had as a 16 year-old. And if you had a different career outside financial services before becoming a financial adviser, you can omit that from your LinkedIn profile too. Recommendations In order to build trust, you should be sure to include testimonials (or recommendations as LinkedIn calls them) on your profile. Those looking for financial advice will be able to look back over your recommendations to see how you have helped clients in the past. This will increase their confidence in you and help them see that you will be able to offer them an excellent service. To gain a testimonial on LinkedIn you could sit back and wait for them to come. But, however great you are, that's unlikely to happen. So instead you will need to send a request a previous client, colleague or boss to submit one. You can do this using the "Ask for a recommendation" at the top of the recommendations section of your profile: In your request message you could simply invite the person to provide you with a testimonial. Or you could send them some choice words and ask them to review and edit. By suggesting a testimonial to them, this reduces the effort required by your connection, and it enables you to keep the text in focus and in line with what you would like new clients to know about you. Skills The skills section of your LinkedIn profile allows you to add up to 50 skills in order to impress. You can simply browse LinkedIn's list of suggested skills and add the ones you possess to your profile. But the really useful part comes when your connections then get the opportunity to validate these skills on your behalf. For example, you can select ‘Financial Planning’ as a skill, and then your connections will be invited to endorse you for this skill, putting more weight behind it. A good set of relevant skills, with multiple endorsements, is key to a good profile. LinkedIn Profile Strength LinkedIn gives each member a profile rating. The highest rating is called All-Star. By the time you have completed all the sections of your LinkedIn profile in full, you will be well on your way to achieving an All-Star rating. According to LinkedIn, profiles with an All-Star rating are are 40 times more likely to get contacted through the platform compared to users who are yet to attain that status. Making Connections on LinkedIn Now that you have an awesome profile, it’s time to start searching for good quality prospects. As with any social media platform, LinkedIn offers a search facility to help you find potential connections. Let’s go back to our example of a financial adviser who is offering financial advice for doctors. Using a keyword search, you can easily find doctors who are present on LinkedIn. You can ask to connect with them to enable you to start your marketing efforts in that niche area. A useful search tip to bear in mind is that LinkedIn supports Boolean search. By combining your keywords with terms such as ‘AND’ and ‘OR’ you can construct some really specific searches. For example, you could carry out a search for “finance AND doctors”. Give it a try and see for yourself how useful it can be to really target your searches. When you ask to make a connection with somebody, it is good practice to personalise your invite. Instead of just simply sending a blank connection request, let that person know why you want to connect and how you can help them. You could say something like - “I see that you are a GP, I often post financial planning tips for doctors which I think you may find really useful. It would be great to connect.” There are some great tools out there that can help with automating the LinkedIn connection process. The one I use quite often myself is called Dux Soup. Tools like Dux Soup run in the background, sending out connection requests to people who match your search criteria. This saves you a lot of time compared to sending each invitation manually. As well as helping to automate invitation messages, Dux Soup can also send a message to your new connection once they have accepted your invitation. You can use a follow up message to highlight a key article to your new connection, or offer them one of your latest lead magnets. A word of warning though. Don't overdo it with your use of these types of automation tools. If LinkedIn catches you using them it can lead to temporary or permanent suspensions of your LinkedIn account. What Can IFAs Post on LinkedIn? As with any social media marketing, you need to keep a consistent presence on LinkedIn so your potential clients don't forget about you. Be sure to post something on LinkedIn at least once a week. And be creative. Don’t just stick to simple text. Your posts can also include images, infographics, videos, and links to articles on other websites (yours or other people's). LinkedIn Posts v LinkedIn Articles LinkedIn offers two ways for you to publish content as a financial adviser: posts and articles. Posts are the most commonly used option. A post will show up in the news feeds of your connections but will have a fairly short lifespan. And the maximum length for a post is 1,300 characters. LinkedIn also offers you the ability to create articles, to do this you need to click on the ‘write an article’ link underneath the box where you would normally start a post: Articles differ from standard posts in a number of ways, and have more in common with blog posts. They feature a large image above your main text. And they give you more control over the formatting of your content. For example, you can add headlines and in-line images. Articles are good if you want to publish a longer piece of content, as they are not subject to the 1,300 character limit that posts have. They also have more longevity than posts because they stay permanently in your LinkedIn profile. LinkedIn Video for IFAs Video seems to be king across most of the social networks at the moment and LinkedIn is no different. Creating and posting video content is widely known to increase engagement amongst your connections. Although appearing on camera can be a bit scary at first, if you plan and prepare your message, it soon gets easier the more videos you create. To take the hard work out of creating your video, why not consider using a video creation and editing tool such as Pictory. This is the perfect option if you have limited experience of making videos or if you want to remain off camera. Pictory lets you take an existing blog post or article and turn it into a video at the click of a button. It automatically finds appropriate stock video footage and overlays each frame with a piece of the text from your original article. You can add an automated voiceover or record your own if you prefer. How to Link to Your Website from LinkedIn LinkedIn has an algorithm which decides which of your connections will see your posts. The algorithm favours posts which do not try to send people away from LinkedIn to other sites. So if you want to include a link to your website or blog in a LinkedIn post, then it's recommended to put the link in a comment rather than in the main body of your post. The First Hour is Crucial In order for your posts and other content such as articles to gain momentum and appear in as many people’s feeds as possible, it’s really important that people engage with them within the first hour of you posting. The more likes and shares that you get within that first hour, the more likely it is that LinkedIn's algorithm will decide to give your post a wide distribution. One way to boost the engagement your posts get in that vital first hour is to join a LinkedIn Engagement Pod. Pods are small groups of people who collaborate to help each other by liking and commenting on each other's posts as soon as they are published. Curating Financial Advice Content for LinkedIn Sharing the latest industry news and trends, and commenting on posts from others in your field is another great way to help your connections whilst at the same time demonstrating that you are an IFA who keeps up to date with what's going on in the financial services industry. If you come across a new article from another financial adviser or from a product provider, you can increase your own exposure by commenting on it to let them know your thoughts on the piece. You can also share it with your own connections. Share Your Successes Potential new clients will love knowing that you have been able to help and support previous clients with the same issues that they are experiencing. With this in mind, why not share a success story once a month. Or you could create a post with text from a recent client testimonial to boost your trust rating. Have you had some exciting news? Perhaps you are featuring on a radio show or have been shortlisted for an award? Let people know so that they can see how well you are doing, and feel more confident taking that next step towards working with you themselves. Let's Get Personal It always good to remain professional on LinkedIn, but that doesn’t mean that you have to talk about work all the time. People buy people, especially when it comes to choosing a financial adviser. So don't be afraid to reveal a little of your personal side on LinkedIn so as current and potential clients can get to know the real you a bit better. There are tasteful ways to keep connections posted about what’s going on with you and how things are day to day behind the scenes. Check out this episode of the LinkedInformed podcast to find out more about why it’s a good idea to share a little of your personal side. Be Interactive As well as creating your own engaging content, you should really spend time commenting and liking posts of your clients and potential new prospects too. What better way to build rapport with potential clients than by showing support for their videos, articles and posts? They will soon notice your positive engagement which should help push you to the forefront of their minds. A Few Final LinkedIn Tips for Financial Advisers LinkedIn has a great direct messaging facility. The messaging facility is similar to platforms such as Facebook Messenger and is quick and easy to use. People may be more likely to respond to a LinkedIn message than a traditional email, so it can be a good way to chase up a client who is taking a while to get back to you with a decision. If you are looking to work with strategic partners, such as solicitors or accountants, LinkedIn is a great platform for enabling this. As mentioned previously, you can make connections and engage with people across any industry, so consider how this might be useful for you in your overall business plan. Just like other social media channels, LinkedIn has its own advertising platform - called LinkedIn Ads. This enables you to show an advert or one of your existing posts to the people you want to target, even if you are not already connected to them. If this sounds like something that you would like to integrate into your marketing strategy, then book a free strategy call with me and I'll be happy to give you some pointers on how to get started. In Summary LinkedIn has a huge amount of potential as a source of leads for financial advisers and financial planners. You can connect with people who fit your ideal customer persona and then publish content which will help them to get to know, like and trust you. And you can do all this for free. It just requires some time and effort on your part and a willingness to post and engage with people on a consistent basis. If you've got a question about using LinkedIn to generate financial adviser leads or if you have a LinkedIn success story you'd like to share, then I'd love to hear from you. Leave a comment in the box below and I promise to get back to you.
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Paul Wilkins
Feb 01, 2022
In Discussions
Financial adviser marketing doesn't stop once you've got people to visit your website or pick up the phone to you. You should consider how to get more of your website visitors to convert into leads and more of your leads to convert into new clients. Here are a few ways to do that: 1. Make it easy for people to book an appointment with you One of the effects of living in the digital age and in the era of Amazon Prime is that people now expect everything to happen instantly. So if it's late at night and someone wants to arrange a meeting with you for later in the week, they don't necessarily want to have to send you an email or fill in a form and wait for you to get back to them the next day. By using an online booking system such as 10to8 (which is free, by the way), you can give people the ability to see when you are available and book themselves in for a meeting or a phone conversation. 2. Chatbots Chatbots have been shown to greatly increase the number of enquiries you can generate from your website. If you're not sure what a chatbot is, click here to see a demo. If you use a service such as ConversioBot, it is very simple to add a chatbot to your site and configure it to ask whatever questions you like. 3. Offer multiple communication channels The more ways you can offer for people to get in touch with you, the more chance there is that they will do so. As well as the traditional channels such as phone and email, think about offering options for people to get in touch with you by text message, WhatsApp, chatbot (see above), social media messaging, etc. Also, make sure that you choose the right communication channel when following up on enquiries you receive. 4. Create a sense of urgency People are notorious for putting off making decisions about their finances, especially when it comes to things like planning for a retirement which seems like it's still a very long way off. A successful financial adviser will try to create a sense of urgency in prospective clients - both when talking to them but also through the content of their online adverts, website content, and other marketing materials. The exact way you do this will vary depending on the products you are promoting and the time of year. For example, in February/March you could highlight the upcoming end of the tax year as a reason for prospects to take action so as not to miss out on using this year's ISA allowance. 5. Use a CRM To get the best conversion rates, it's important to follow up with prospects in a timely fashion and to not forget where you are up to in your conversations with them. By putting a customer relationship management (CRM) system in place you can easily keep track of all your enquiries and set automatic reminders to make sure you get back to people when you say you will and to ensure you keep following up with prospects who haven't yet got back to you with a decision. There are loads of cloud based CRM systems available for a low monthly subscription. My personal favourite is Pipedrive. Getting More Repeat Business as an IFA And finally, once you've followed all the above advice and got yourself a load of new clients, it's important to retain them and encourage them to do more business with you in the future. These final tips cover some of the ways you can do this: - Be proactive Don't sit back and wait for existing clients to get back in touch with you. Give them a call once or twice a year, or send them some info by email every so often, just to see how they're getting on and to make sure they don't forget about you. - Send thank you letters It may sound old-fashioned, but a simple thank you letter sent to a client after they have done business with you for the first time will go a long way towards cementing that client-adviser relationship. Ideally the letter or, at the very least, the envelope, should be handwritten to give that extra personal touch. - Send birthday cards It's almost certain that you will know the date of birth of each of your clients. So why not send them birthday cards? As well as being a nice gesture that will help make you stand out from other companies and professionals that they deal with, birthday cards are a great way of reminding your clients that you exist! Your Financial Adviser Marketing Plan Now that we've reached the end of this list of financial adviser marketing ideas, I'd love to know what you think and what you plan to do next. Are there any marketing strategies from this list that you're already using successfully? Which new ideas are you keen to try out next? Have you got a great marketing tip to share with us that's not in my list? Do leave a comment below or ask any questions you might have and I promise to reply with an answer.
How Can IFA's Generate More Enquiries and Sales? content media
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Paul Wilkins
Jul 12, 2021
In Discussions
Before you begin any marketing campaigns there are certain things you need to get sorted out. If you overlook these then you're not going to get the best return on investment from whatever marketing you do. 1. Create a marketing plan You know what they say: proper preparation prevents #%@$-poor performance. And this applies just as much to marketing as it does to anything else. Unless you have a clear idea of what your marketing goals are, plus a way to accurately measure the success of your campaigns, your marketing efforts are doomed to fail. Pick a few marketing ideas from this list (not so many that you risk getting overwhelmed) and decide how and when you will implement them, what sort of marketing budget you need for each one, and what results you expect to get. At the very least you should set targets for your results in terms of the number of new clients generated and the cost per acquisition - i.e. how much it costs to get each new client on board. Review your progress regularly against the plan and your objectives and don't be afraid to ditch a particular marketing strategy if you reach the point where it clearly isn't working. 2. Identify your target audience As a financial adviser it's very easy to say that everyone could benefit from your services and that therefore everyone should be part of your target audience when it comes to marketing your business. Wrong! There are all sorts of people who you should not be trying to get as clients. Those who don't have enough money to pay your fees would be just one example. You will get much better results from your marketing and build a much more stable and enjoyable business if you get clarity on what your ideal customer looks like. If you haven't done that exercise yet, I’ll be talking about Customer Personas and Avatars in a later comment. 3. Find your niche This goes hand-in-hand with knowing who your ideal customer is. There are many benefits that come from niching your financial advice business to focus on particular types of clients or specific areas of financial planning. 4. Develop your value proposition One of the challenges faced by financial advisers is that you're all selling the same products from the same providers. And if you're not an IFA or a whole-of-market adviser then you're actually going to be offering less products than many of your competitors. So, trying to differentiate your business based on the products you offer is likely to be a non-starter. Instead, you need to find other ways to separate yourself from the competition and give potential clients a reason to choose you over any other financial adviser. The best way to do this to develop a strong value proposition and then make sure you use it on your website and all your other marketing materials. 5. Identify your prospects' pain points Whatever kind of business you're in, there are only really two reasons why people buy your products or services: either to experience pleasure or to avoid pain. Here's an example. Suppose I go to see the dentist and he tells me about an amazing new toothpaste that will make my teeth whiter, my gums healthier, and will even make all my food taste better. Sounds great. Who wouldn't want all those things? And then the dentist tells me that this toothpaste costs £20 per tube. Suddenly, no matter how great it sounds and however much pleasure I might get from having whiter teeth and better tasting food, I'm not so keen on buying this fancy new toothpaste. Now imagine I've gone to that same dentist for an emergency appointment because I've had terrible toothache for the past 48 hours and have barely been able to sleep due to the pain. The dentist tells me that I need to have the tooth removed and it will cost £500. I pay him without a second thought. Generally speaking, people are more likely to buy your services to avoid a pain than they are to enjoy a gain. So why do people need financial advisers? And what motivates them to seek out the services of an adviser right now rather than at some unspecified time in the future? You're more likely to find the answer if you focus on the pain(s) you solve for people. For example, suppose you're trying to sell me a pension. You could try telling me about the wonderful retirement I might end up enjoying many years from now. Or you could tell me that paying into a pension will mean I get to reduce this year's tax bill. Which do think is most likely to grab my attention? 6. Understand the theory of know, like and trust I'm sure you've heard it said before that people buy people. In other words, it's often how we feel about the person who's trying to sell us a product or service which determines whether we buy it or not. This is especially true when it comes to important things like our health or our wealth. Or, as Google calls them, the YMYL subjects (your money or your life). This means that a successful marketing campaign for a financial adviser needs to be designed to take prospects through a three-stage process whereby they firstly come to know of you, then they get to like you, and finally come to trust you. Only after someone has completed all three phases of that marketing journey are you likely to land them as a new client.
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Paul Wilkins
Jul 12, 2021
In Discussions
Many of you reading this will now be quite used to working from home. As coronavirus continued and many of the lockdown restrictions remained in place, a large portion of the workforce has said goodbye to the commute and hello to home working. Of course, this isn’t a luxury — it's been a necessity for the last few months. But as time passes and working from home becomes the new normal, it begs the question: should we continue working from home in the post-lockdown world? Here we explore that issue and consider whether, once the lockdown is fully lifted, we should all ditch the office and embrace home working forever. Working from home may be a necessity The future of the world post-coronavirus is uncertain and fears of another spike persist. The fact is, no-one knows exactly what a post-lockdown world will look like. Consequently, working from home might well become an option for those who can do it. For those workers who are able to work from home, their employers might well request they do so for the long-term. As and when it comes, the return to the office could take a number of different forms. Some businesses are considering letting set numbers of staff work in their office on a rota, for instance Other businesses with larger premises are even dividing their workspaces into segments, with certain staff only permitted to work in certain areas. It may be more difficult for smaller businsses What’s your opinion. Do you see your business using more hybrid working practices and how do you feel about that? Let us know by replying to this post.
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Paul Wilkins
Aug 25, 2020
In Discussions
Whenever I speak to Financial Advisers or Wealth Management companies, the answer I usually get is ‘we don’t do marketing, we’re busy enough as we are’ or ‘There’s no point doing any marketing due to the FCA restrictions’. Chances are that if you’re reading this forum, you are probably interested in how marketing can work for financial services providers, so below I will outline some free or low-cost marketing ideas for IFA’s. As Financial advisors work in such a regulated industry, being familiar with the rules and regulations as laid out in the financial promotions handbook by the FCA is essential. But don’t let the rules and regulations put you off – marketing is still possible! In essence, advisers need to ensure that promotions such as websites, blog posts and social media posts are fair, clear and not misleading. The full guidance can be found here. Whilst there are restrictions on what IFA’s can talk about in their marketing in terms of product and planning advice, there are a multitude of marketing activities that Financial Advisers can take part in whilst remaining compliant. Some of these suggested activities are free or incur a small cost 1. Ask for Google Reviews Although a personal recommendation from a friend/colleague/trusted advisor will always be the best source of referral, people seem to trust online reviews. In fact, 86% of consumers read reviews for local businesses, and 57% of consumers will only use a business if it has 4 or more stars (source: BrightLocal.com). There are a variety of online review tools available but arguably Google Reviews is the most important one. Not only do positive and regular reviews build trust with consumers looking to use your services, but it will also help your local SEO. You may want to pick a certain point within your working relationship with a client and politely ask them to complete a Google Review for you. These can then be used further as a testimonials on the website, social media, case studies or simply as market research. For those who really want to embrace reviews I would recommend using a paid for service like Trust Pilot – this is a more credible and managed source of reviews (others are available). 2. Communicate with your clients You are likely to have regular meetings booked in with your clients to discuss financial advice, but are you missing a trick if you don’t communicate with them in between? Send out regular communications such as newsletters and e-shots – these can be on team news, recent blog posts you’ve written, industry news, or just generally providing updates about financial products. 3. Write helpful blogs You are an expert in what you do and are familiar with the questions and areas your prospects and clients require assistance with. Not only will a well-written blog help demonstrate your expertise, it will help establish you as a thought leader, drive traffic to your website and provide a genuinely useful resource to clients. 4. Expand your referrer network Referrals from solicitors and accountants can make up the majority of new leads for IFA’s so it is crucial that these relationships are nurtured. Look to expand on them by being proactive in asking associates and clients for introductions and try to set up face to face meetings. Once the relationship is established, make an effort to keep in touch on a regular basis – be that through phone calls, email or by specifically organising referrer events. 5. Networking events - virtual and in person This point ties in with the previous one. Start by researching local networking events who attract the type of people that you want to meet, and consistently make an effort to go along and meet new people. Be interested in what people do and introduce them to others who you think they might benefit from talking to. 6. Get active on social media Many IFA’s seem to shy away from engaging in social media as the rules around financial promotion seemingly limit the type of content they can post about. As long as there is no incitement to engage in financial activity, social media use is fine. Rather than talking about individual products, IFA’s can talk about other parts of their firm, their typical client, staff spotlights of their advisers, charity engagement, or provide general commentary on economic or political developments. I appreciate that all these activities take up time and resources so why not focus on one of the above ideas over the course of a month or so – or you can of course employ a specialist agency, such as Azzurro, to do it on your behalf. What's your opinion? Share your thoughts and experience with us.
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